FAQs2023-08-16T10:17:08-07:00

If you own a stucco and lath and plaster home you are aware of the low-maintenance, sound-insulating benefits of this beautiful exterior siding material.  We are here at Nurse Stucco to answer any of your questions – none are too simple or complicated – so call us and have a conversation with Blaine or Darren. Better yet, call and make an appointment and let us see your home or commercial project so we can answer your specific questions intelligently.

We strive to fully inform our customers and encourage you to contact us to learn more about your stucco project and how to protect your home or commercial building.

stucco lath plasterStucco is a popular building material for several reasons. First and foremost, it offers excellent durability and longevity, making it a reliable choice for exterior surfaces. Stucco can withstand various weather conditions, including extreme heat, cold, and moisture, without deteriorating easily.

Additionally, stucco provides a versatile and customizable finish. It can be applied in different textures and colors, allowing for a wide range of design possibilities. Whether a smooth, textured, or patterned appearance is desired, stucco can be tailored to meet specific aesthetic preferences.

Furthermore, stucco has excellent fire-resistant properties, which adds an extra layer of safety to buildings. It doesn’t contribute to the spread of flames and can help contain fires, providing valuable time for occupants to evacuate.

Stucco is also relatively low-maintenance compared to other materials. It does not require frequent repainting or sealing, reducing long-term maintenance costs. Moreover, it is resistant to insects, such as termites, offering added protection to structures.

Lastly, stucco is an energy-efficient option. It has insulating properties that can help regulate indoor temperatures by reducing heat transfer, resulting in potential energy savings for homeowners and building owners.

Considering its durability, versatility, fire resistance, low maintenance, insect resistance, and energy efficiency, it’s no wonder that stucco remains a popular choice in the construction industry.

Are plaster, stucco, and EIFS the same?2023-08-05T12:23:59-07:00

No, plaster, stucco, and EIFS (Exterior Insulation and Finish System) are not the same, although they are all used in construction and building finishes. Here’s a brief explanation of each:

1. Plaster: Plaster is a traditional building material that has been used for centuries. It is a mixture of water, sand, and either lime or gypsum. Plaster can be applied to interior walls and ceilings to create a smooth and durable surface. It is commonly used in residential and commercial buildings.

2. Stucco: Stucco is also a traditional building material, but it is typically used on exterior surfaces. It is made by combining cement, sand, and water. Stucco provides a textured finish to the exterior of buildings and is known for its durability and weather resistance. It can be applied directly to a masonry or metal lath surface.

3. EIFS: EIFS, or Exterior Insulation and Finish System, is a modern alternative to traditional stucco. It is a lightweight cladding system that combines insulation board, mesh reinforcement, and a textured finish. EIFS provides both insulation and weatherproofing, making it energy-efficient and attractive. It is often used in commercial and residential buildings to improve energy efficiency and enhance aesthetics.

In summary, while plaster, stucco, and EIFS share some similarities as construction materials, they differ in terms of their application, composition, and purpose.

Why is stucco your best choice for home siding?2023-08-05T11:44:18-07:00

Stucco is a popular building material for several reasons. First and foremost, it offers excellent durability and longevity, making it a reliable choice for exterior surfaces. Stucco can withstand various weather conditions, including extreme heat, cold, and moisture, without deteriorating easily.

Additionally, stucco provides a versatile and customizable finish. It can be applied in different textures and colors, allowing for a wide range of design possibilities. Whether a smooth, textured, or patterned appearance is desired, stucco can be tailored to meet specific aesthetic preferences.

Furthermore, stucco has excellent fire-resistant properties, which adds an extra layer of safety to buildings. It doesn’t contribute to the spread of flames and can help contain fires, providing valuable time for occupants to evacuate.

Stucco is also relatively low-maintenance compared to other materials. It does not require frequent repainting or sealing, reducing long-term maintenance costs. Moreover, it is resistant to insects, such as termites, offering added protection to structures.

Lastly, stucco is an energy-efficient option. It has insulating properties that can help regulate indoor temperatures by reducing heat transfer, resulting in potential energy savings for homeowners and building owners.

Considering its durability, versatility, fire resistance, low maintenance, insect resistance, and energy efficiency, it’s no wonder that stucco remains a popular choice in the construction industry.

What is Spray Monokote Fireproofing?2023-08-18T17:15:44-07:00

Spray Monokote® Fireproofing is a popular fireproofing material used in office buildings, schools, hospitals, warehouses, and other large buildings that are constructed out of concrete and steel.

Resembling wet cement when applied, Monokote® fireproofing spray is applied in order to help prevent structural failure during a high-temperature blaze. In many areas, building codes require the use of “passive” fire-protection materials like Monokote® in certain structures.

Not only will this help prevent a building from collapsing, but it will give the occupants of a building more time to escape in the event of a fire. This latter benefit is especially important in high-occupancy structures where people can become trapped inside if the right precautions haven’t been taken.

Nurse Stucco is the spray Monokote fireproofing contractor of choice for materials and installation in Southern California and San Diego County. We are a family-owned and operated C-35 contractor company that has built a reputation for continually surpassing the expectations of our customers. When it comes to protecting your building from a disastrous fire, Nurse Stucco has you covered.

Call or e-mail us today for more information about Monokote fireproofing materials or to request a bid on your project. Fireproofing your building today can potentially save you thousands or even millions of dollars in repair costs in the aftermath of a fire. More importantly, it may even save lives.

What kind of fire rating does stucco provide?2023-08-16T10:45:06-07:00

Portland cement-based plaster, commonly called stucco, has long been and continues to be a popular choice for finishes on buildings. It allows for a wide expression of aesthetics, is a cost-effective finish, is durable in all types of climates (especially wet ones), and offers fire resistance. Fire resistance is typically classified by a fire rating, but what kind of fire rating does plaster provide?

Things that influence the fire rating of a plaster system include the type of material used for the support member, size of the support member, presence/absence and type of exterior sheathing, aggregate in the plaster mix, presence/absence of insulation, presence/absence of interior wall finishing materials (gypsum wallboard, etc.) and thickness of the section. The type of member—wall, partition, ceiling, or other, and member classification (load bearing(LB) or non-load bearing (NLB)) also influences the rating.

In 1991, the Foundation of the Wall and Ceiling Industry published a reference guide on portland cement-based plaster/stucco systems used for fire protection, the Single Source Document on Fire-Rated Portland Cement-Based Plaster Assemblies. Designers, specifiers, building code officials, contractors, and general public are the intended audience. The information contained therein is “not intended as design or installation criteria,” but can help people determine how to assess their assemblies using the referenced publications, fire test reports, industry standards, and codes.

For example, a typical residential application might be a three-coat system of plaster over 2-by-4-inch wood studs using metal lath attached to the studs, either with or without a layer of sheathing, like plywood. On the interior side would be a layer of gypsum board. The detail for a system made with these components is assigned a one-hour fire rating based on 1988 Uniform Building Code information.

What Is the correct thickness of stucco?2023-08-05T12:58:12-07:00

Stucco thickness depends on the backup system and on whether or not lath is present. In ASTM C926, the Standard Specification for Application of Portland Cement-Based Plaster, thicknesses are provided for scratch, brown, and finish coats.

Over frame construction, lath must be used. Over solid substrates—which include concrete masonry, cast-in-place concrete, and precast concrete—lath is sometimes used. When lath is present, three-coat plaster is recommended. Note that frame construction—metal or wood studs—may or may not have sheathing present, but that plaster thickness is independent of sheathing. With lath, total plaster thickness is 7/8 inch.

Three-coat work can also be specified for solid plaster bases without metal lath. The correct thickness is then 5/8 inch.

Two-coat applications are only for use over solid plaster bases without metal lath. For unit masonry, that thickness is ½ inch. For cast-in-place or precast concrete, the thickness for two-coat work is 3/8 inch. These are direct-applied systems, meaning that there is no metal lath involved.

The intent of the specified thickness is to provide a reasonable system that, over many years, has proven itself to be weather resistant and durable. Local building officials should be consulted for further information about variations from the specified thickness, or call Nurse Stucco for specifics for your community.

More questions, or need a FREE ESTIMATE for the lathing portion of your project? Nurse Stucco has been here in San Diego serving our residential and commercial contractors for over 40 years. Call Us!

 

How Do I Maintain My Stucco?2023-08-16T10:24:41-07:00

Maintaining stucco requires regular care and attention to keep it in good condition. Here are some tips to help you maintain your stucco:

1. Cleaning: Periodically clean the stucco surface to remove dirt, dust, and debris. You can use a soft-bristle brush or a low-pressure power washer to gently scrub the surface. Avoid using high-powered pressure washers as they can damage the stucco.

2. Inspect for Damage: Regularly inspect your stucco for any signs of cracks, chips, or other damage. Addressing small issues promptly can prevent them from becoming bigger problems. Repair any damaged areas using a suitable stucco patching compound.

3. Moisture Control: Keep an eye on the moisture levels around your stucco. Ensure proper drainage away from the stucco walls to prevent water buildup. Water accumulation can lead to mold growth and damage the stucco over time.

4. Paint Maintenance: If your stucco is painted, inspect the paint regularly for any signs of peeling or fading. Repaint as necessary to protect the stucco and maintain its aesthetic appeal.

5. Trim Vegetation: Trim back any shrubs, trees, or vines growing near the stucco walls. Vegetation can damage the stucco surface, trap moisture, and promote the growth of mold and mildew.

6. Professional Inspection: Consider hiring a professional stucco inspector every few years to assess the condition of your stucco. They can identify any underlying issues and provide recommendations for maintenance or repairs.

Remember that proper maintenance and care are essential for extending the lifespan of your stucco and keeping it looking its best.

What is the purpose of lath behind the stucco?2023-08-05T12:40:55-07:00

Rigid materials are used behind the stucco, and are directly attached to the support studs in your wall on top of a weather-resistant barrier, so the sheathing is protected from moisture.  That means that many materials are suitable for this application, but the common ones remain plywood, oriented strand board (OSB), cement board, and exterior grade gypsum sheathing. 

In the early 1910s, wooden lath, small, narrow boards (1/4-by-1 ½ inches), were also common at that time. Although it’s not exactly clear when metal lath was first used in plaster applications, it appears that both metal and wood lath were available at least as early as 1910.

Common sheathing materials today come in 4-by-8-foot boards. These are readily available building materials of consistent quality and are easy to install over wood or steel frames. The boards assure a more uniform thickness of the plaster layer and add structural rigidity to the building frame. The currently preferred practice in many regions is to use sheathing boards for frame construction with metal lath to provide the attachment support structure for your stucco.

Call Nurse Stucco with your questions (or use our simple contact form) and reach out to us for your FREE ESTIMATE for your stucco project.

What is a CSLB C-35 Lathing and Plastering Contractor2023-08-21T13:42:10-07:00

C-35 – Lathing and Plastering Contractor

California Code of Regulations
Title 16, Division 8, Article 3. Classifications

(a) A lathing and plastering contractor coats surfaces with a mixture of sand, gypsum plaster, quick-lime or hydrated lime and water, or sand and cement and water, or a combination of such other materials that create a permanent surface coating, including coatings for the purpose of soundproofing and fireproofing. These coatings are applied with a plasterer’s trowel or sprayed over any surface which offers a mechanical means for the support of such coating, and will adhere by suction. This contractor also installs lath (including metal studs) or any other material prepared or manufactured to provide a base or bond for such coating.

(b) A lathing and plastering contractor also applies and affixes wood and metal lath, or any other material prepared or manufactured to provide key or suction bases for the support of plaster coatings. This classification includes the channel work and metal studs for the support of metal or any other lathing material and for solid plaster partitions.

(c) Effective January 1, 1998, or as soon thereafter as administratively feasible, all C-26 licensees will be merged into the C-35 Lathing and Plastering classification. On and after January 1, 1998, no application for the C-26 classification will be accepted and no new C-26 Lathing licenses will be issued.

Authority cited: Sections 7008 and 7059, Reference: Sections 7058 and 7059 (Business and Professions Code)

Can stucco be painted?2023-08-05T12:20:03-07:00

Yes, stucco can be painted. In fact, painting stucco is a common practice in San Diego to enhance its appearance and provide protection against the elements. Before painting, it is important to properly prepare the stucco surface by cleaning it, repairing any cracks or damage, and applying a primer. This helps ensure that the paint adheres well and provides a long-lasting finish. Additionally, choosing a high-quality exterior paint specifically formulated for stucco will help achieve the best results.

If you’re considering painting over your existing stucco siding, give Nurse Stucco a call at (619) 561-7429 and ask them for a FREE ESTIMATE to restucco instead of painting. There’s NO OBLIGATION with the estimate, and it will help you make the best choices for your home. Many times our customers find that the cost is similar, and there are benefits are greater with stucco.

 

 

 

How long does stucco last on a building?2023-08-05T13:03:40-07:00

While the service life of stucco can’t be quantified as a specific number of years, properly applied and maintained portland cement plaster, or stucco, is as durable as any commonly used cladding material. Its hard surface resists abrasion and can take a lot of physical abuse. It stands up to all sorts of climates, from cold to hot and wet to dry. Many homes built in the early 1900s have had very little maintenance and remain in good shape today.

At Nurse Stucco, we provide a written 25-year warranty on our work.  

Go to Top